Famous Indian Unique Festivals

Besides its beautiful nature and unique architecture, India also brings you more interesting experiences, which are festivals with its own national identity.

India is known as the home of many religions. In addition, India is a country of many unique constructions. However, you forget that India is the motherland of special and meaningful festivals.

If you’ve ever heard of the festival of colors, that’s the Holi Festival in India. During the festival, participants will either throw pigments or mix colors with water and throw them at each other. According to the old concept, the more people receive more colors, the better the new year will be.

However, Diwali is the most important festival in the culture of thousands of years old in this country. Diwali festival, which takes place within 5 days, meant to welcome a new year of Hinduism. People pray for peace and wish that the righteous power will overwhelm darkness and poverty. Accordingly, the important meaning of the festival does not stop at lighting the candles outside, but every citizen here must also be aware of the “inner light”, which is the true nature and good direction of each you.

Besides the Diwali light festival, Ganesha is also one of the oldest and important festivals of Hindus in India. According to Indian mythology, Ganesha was the son of Siva and the goddess Parvati. Ganesha is a wise god who always brings luck and happiness to people.

With that in mind, during the festival, you will easily catch the statue of Ganesha being carried majestically and splendidly from the countryside to the city. On the final day of the festival, the Ganesha statue is placed in the car, carried through the cities before dropping into a river, pond or sea.

Meaningful festivals take place throughout the year and become a memorable experience for most tourists coming here. They freely mingle with the influx of people, perform traditional rituals and receive good luck as indigenous people. That helps many people realize that there is such a friendly and gentle India.

Indian Tourism: The Holi Festival of Hindus

The Indian people are once again immersed in the vibrant festival atmosphere which is a characteristic of this country.

From March 20-21, the Hindu community in particular and people all over the Indian region in general jubilantly celebrate Holi celebrations, also known as the color festival, one of the biggest holidays in this South Asian country.

Holi festival is held annually on the full moon day of the month of Falgun Hindu calendar (usually falls in March), marking the end of the winter, the beginning of Spring and also the symbol of the victory of the good before evil, especially the eradication of the female demon Holika.

This is also an opportunity for friends and relatives to gather, play, wish each other good things and show gratitude to the gods who gave them a good harvest.

On the eve of Holi, Indians grouped up large bonfires called Holika Dahan, symbolizing the burning of the Holika demon. People gather around the fire, perform rituals and pray for loved ones to be healthy and well-off.

The main day of this festival is the sprawling day of covering and flooding the streets, especially in the common areas of the community. On this day, everyone has fun, from children to adults, men and women all prepare themselves with bags of pigments, water balls and water-spraying guns to color each other. They dance, sing and immerse themselves in a vibrant and magical music space.

l is the sprawling day of covering and flooding the streets, especially in the common areas of the community. On this day, everyone has fun, from children to adults, men and women all prepare themselves with bags of pigments, water balls and water-spraying guns to color each other. They dance, sing and immerse themselves in a vibrant and magical music space.

Traditionally, these colors are blended from natural plants, so they can be easily removed like saffron, sandalwood and roses. Everyone together rushed to the street to participate in this exciting game. By the end of the morning, everyone looks like a colorful picture.

People gather in groups to sing and dance while drumming and dholak. Every time the “battle” with the colors is paused, everyone will eat gujiya, mathri, malpuas and many other traditional dishes. Bhang, a drink made from local herbs is also an integral part of the Holi festival.

India Travel: Diwali – Festival of Light

Diwali is one of the most important Hindu festivals that originated in ancient India. The Diwali Festival, also known as the festival of lights held in the middle of October and early November, lies with the meaning of banishing evil and bringing light to everyone.

There is a legend that Diwali is the marriage ceremony between the goddess Lakshmi and God Vishnu who is the supreme deity of Brahmanism. However, there is also a theory that Diwali was the triumphant day of God Rama returning to his home town of Ayodhy when defeating God Ravana after 14 years of exile in the deep forest. However, for many Indians, Diwali is an occasion to pay homage to the goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of happiness, prosperity, and beauty. They believe that thanks to the goddess they get lucky and succeed in daily life.

Diwali festival takes place in 5 days. On the first day, the day Dhanatrayodashi (or Dhan Teras) was the day of prosperity and wealth. People often go to buy gold and buy household appliances. On the second day, Naraka Chaturdashi, the day the demon Narakasura was killed meant the light had won the darkness. The third day, Lakshmi Puja, is the most important day of the festival. Indian families offered the god Lakshmi and the god Ganesa, the god of good beginnings. People burn lights and candles everywhere in the house and in the street. The fourth day, Govardhan Puja (also known as Annakut), is the day Krishna defeated Indra. On this day, beautifully decorated food items and arranged in small mountains symbolize the mountain that Krishma had to overcome. Husbands often give gifts to their wives on the day of Govardhan Puja. The fifth day, Bhaduj, is the day the siblings meet.

The festival’s features include the indulgent traditional Indian dances with famous Bollywood songs and even the special circus regrets. More fun in the bustling atmosphere is when people enjoy traditional Indian specialties such as goat curry or marinated chicken wings. In addition, there are entertainment booths for children such as dancing castles, sand paintings and more.

The bright light and the fun atmosphere of singing and dancing make people close to each other, understand each other better and more tolerant. Diwali Festival of Light is also an opportunity for Indian people to shake off their piety and forgiveness for others so that they can live more happily and peacefully.